Vehicle Size Matters for Pedestrians

062018-suv-sales-FULL_1.png

An adult is 2-3 times more likely to be killed when struck by an SUV than by a typical passenger car. Children have a 4x fatality risk when hit by an SUV than a passenger car. 
The increased sales of SUVs and small trucks which overrun our streets helps to explain the massive uptick in pedestrian deaths over the past couple of years - not pedestrian distraction.

Data and honest safety experts have verified that long-standing common factors in pedestrian deaths, such as alcohol and jaywalking at night, did not account for the recent growth in ped fatalities. The myth of distracted pedestrians is lazy and dangerous. 

 

"SUVs and pickups account for closer to 40 % of pedestrian fatalities, which suggests that more severe injuries sustained in crashes are also from these vehicles. According to a recent study, a pedestrian is 2-3 times more likely to suffer a fatality when struck by an SUV or pickup truck than when struck by a typical passenger car.  The fatality rate for small children is four times greater.

 

If you're wondering why SUVs, pickup trucks and small trucks are so deady - it's the point of impact being the chest, which will knock you down, versus the leg where you may be more likely to land on the hood. 

 
 
increasesppedincreasdeaths2-FULL_Online.png

The perils of pedestrianism on Long Island, which seems to be SUV-land, is two-fold: dangerously designed suburban streets and highways + obsession with owning SUVs and smaller trucks. Engineers dropped the ball throughout Long Island, designing wide streets to accommodate painting 14'+ width lanes and intersections so wide that a driver need not remove their foot from the pedal. Residential streets mimic highways, incentivizing speed. 

 

 

PSAP funding for local roads announced

This is an update to our April announcement "$12 million awarded for NY P-SAP local call"

Governor  Cuomo announced $62 million in funding as part of the  governor's five-year $110 million New York State Pedestrian Safety Action Plan, which calls for a systemic approach to proactively address safety issues and minimize the potential for crashes through engineering, enforcement and education.  More than $22 million went towards pedestrian safety projects on state roads, which are currently underway, while $40 million is being invested to enhance pedestrian safety on local roadways.  Funding is being provided for cost-effective upgrades that greatly improve safety for pedestrians. Upgrades could include the installation of high visibility crosswalk markings and additional signs, as well as signalization enhancements.


A total of $12.78 million has been allotted  on Long Island, including:

  • $2.78 million to Suffolk County for locations in the towns of Huntington, Islip, Brookhaven, Smithtown and Babylon, for Phase 1 of Suffolk County’s Pedestrian Signal Safety Improvement project

  • $4.13 million to Suffolk County for locations in the towns of Huntington, Islip, Brookhaven, Smithtown, Riverhead and Southampton, for Phase 2 of Suffolk County’s Pedestrian Signal Safety Improvement project

  • $330,000 to Nassau County for a project in the village of Great Neck Plaza in the town of North Hempstead for curb extensions at the intersection of South Middle Neck Road and Barstown Road

  • $4.22 million to Nassau county for locations in the towns of Hempstead, Oyster Bay and North Hempstead, the village of Freeport in the town of Hempstead, and the city of Glen Cove, for safety improvements at uncontrolled crosswalks

  • $1.32 million to the town of Brookhaven, Suffolk County

Long Island Streets has been working with Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (PSAP) educational materials and engaging with the Governors Traffic Safety Committee on best practices for bringing the messaging down to and throughout Long Island. In addition, we have engaged with NYSDOT Region 10 and several municipalities on the funding applications to make certain we squeezed the maximum amount of local funding available. Long Island Streets is the only not-for-profit covering Nassau County and Suffolk County actively engaging with local, state and regional agencies on PSAP.

Suffolk County Picks Zagster to Operate Bike-Share Program

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone has announced Boston-based Zagste aka Pace will operate the county's dockless bike share program. 

Zagster8-Real.jpg

Zagster is a Boston-based company that has run bike sharing programs for hotels, businesses and universities across North America since 2007. They entered the start-up dockless tech field a few years ago, and currently operate bike share systems in 35 states. Zagster's dockless bike share system is called Pace.

Pace are zippier, smaller bikes than the heavy CitiBikes and have a light commuter-cruiser look. Pace bikes are lock-to dockless bikes, similar to Long Beach's SoBi (Social Bikes - Jump), versus free-floating systems like LimeBike, Ofo, Spin or a dozen others. This could alleviate concerns of bike-shares being tossed around, and will most likely increase bike racks popping up.

The RFP for a bike share program was issued in March (recap here). The rollout date is sooner than later, as County Executive Bellone is anxious to get people peddling through Suffolk this summer. 

 

Screen+Shot+2018-03-04+at+10.39.50+AM.png

Bike to School Day 2018

What a day! Over 100 students participated in  #BikeToSchoolDay at Sea Cliff Elementary School. The Village of Sea Cliff has tremendous community buy-in for all things bikey and walkable, which makes events like this successful. The bicycle racks at Sea Cliff Elementary School are on the front lawn, not hidden to the side or behind the school.

Special thanks to the Village of Sea Cliff Traffic & Transportation Committee and Long Island Streets for organizing this in partnership with NY Coalition for Transportation Safety and Cohen Children's Medical Center! 

 

Safe Routes to School program & infrastructure upgrades in Hempstead Village

A $510,000 Safe Routes to School federal grant will fund infrastructure improvements and education programming to the David Paterson Elementary School in Hempstead Village. This project proposes to enhance pedestrian safety and encourage students of the David Paterson Elementary School to walk to school in a safe environment. 

Screen Shot 2018-04-16 at 9.23.11 AM.png

The work will be performed on the adjacent roadways to the school including the widening of existing sidewalks on Fulton Avenue and W. Orchard Street adjacent to the school and the installation of high visibility crosswalks, pedestrian warning signage and ADA compliant handicap ramps at the intersections within the project area.  

Construction to begin this summer, to be completed by the start of school this fall. Two other schools received similar funding, with work to begin next year, Jackson Main School and Alverta B. Gray Schultz Middle School. 

We will be updating details on the Safe Routes to School program shortly. 

Report: NYS Park System Economic Benefits

Long Island's state parks expand the island's economy by millions, according to a NY Parks & Trails report. The 21.7 million Long Island state park visitors between April 2015 - March 2016 spent $1.3 billion, adding jobs opportunities in the parks as well as nearby restaurants, stores, hotels and suppliers, from trucking firms to sporting goods stores.

 "Combining both visitor and state government spending, the study finds that the economic significance of the New York State park system supports 54,000 jobs, $5 billion in sales, and
$2.9 billion in state GDP. Of this, the economic impacts – which exclude local visitors but include non-local visitors and state government expenditures – total 27,000 jobs, $2.6 billion in sales, and $1.5 billion in state GDP."

Read full report HERE

Transportation-head Helena Williams appointed Deputy County Executive

An advocate for Long Island commuters, former President of LIRR and of LI buses is going to be the Deputy Nassau County Executive. Helena Williams is N.C. Executive Elect Laura Curran's pick. This is tremendous, looking forward to a more sane bus and transportation network that will be reliable and offer dignity to our commuters throughout the island. 

 Helena Williams and Laura Curran, photo: Newsday

Helena Williams and Laura Curran, photo: Newsday